Monday, November 19, 2018

Monday roundup (11-19-18)

Authoritarianism: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)






Corporate America's Debt Boom Looks Like a Bust for the Economy (Bloomberg)

Trump made some very scary statements about North Korea in his Fox News interview: It looks like he actually considered war at one point. (Vox)


U.S. troops to begin leaving the border (Axios)

Senate Democrats sue to block Trump’s acting attorney general, Matt Whitaker (The Washington Post)




Trump’s pattern of insulting war heroes continues with commander of bin Laden raid (The Washington Post) 'Patently ridiculous': Former top intel officials hit back at Trump after criticism of bin Laden raid: "This president owes Admiral McRaven and all of the SEALS involved in that operation an apology for what he's saying," Leon Panetta said. (NBCNews) Retired Admiral McRaven repeats: Trump's media attacks 'greatest threat to our democracy' (USAToday) Revoke my security clearance, too, Mr. President [Aug. 16] (The Washington Post)

























 


Zinke’s #2 has so many potential conflicts of interest he has to carry a list of them all (The Washington Post)

Ivanka Trump used a personal email account to send hundreds of emails about government business last year ["many of them in violation of federal records rules"] (The Washington Post)





Sears is just one of five retailers that have no room for error this holiday season (CNBC)

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Sunday, November 18, 2018

Sunday roundup (11-18-18)

Trump's private line: Khashoggi murder "really bad" but others do it (Axios) Lindsey Graham: 'Impossible to believe' Saudi Crown Prince was unaware of Khashoggi killing: "He is irrational, he is unhinged, and I think he has done a lot of damage" to the U.S.-Saudi relationship, Graham said. (NBCNews)




'Entire world is worried' after rancorous Asia-Pacific trade summit (USAToday) Pence's Sharp China Attacks Fuel Fears of New Cold War (Bloomberg) The ‘Madman’ Behind Trump’s Trade Theory: Peter Navarro—a business-school professor, a get-rich guru, a former Peace Corps member, and a former Democrat—is among the most important generals in Trump’s trade war. (The Atlantic)

Trump Is Beginning to Lose His Grip: It isn’t just white suburban women who switched to Democrats. Parts of rural and white working class America peeled off too. (The New York Times)

Trump says he wouldn’t stop acting attorney general from curtailing Mueller probe (The Washington Post)

Trump’s battle to destroy the Mueller investigation is officially doomed (The Washington Post)

Trump calls congressman Adam Schiff 'little Adam Schitt' in tweet: "Wow, Mr. President, that’s a good one. Was that like your answers to Mr. Mueller’s questions, or did you write this one yourself?" Schiff fired back. (NBCNews)




Trump suggests venerated Navy SEAL commander should have found bin Laden faster (The Washington Post)













The President’s Coal Warrior: Inside EPA head Andrew Wheeler’s highly effective campaign to sacrifice public health in favor of the fossil-fuel industry (RollingStone)

Democrats sweep Reagan Country in California (CNN)

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Saturday roundup (11-17-18)

Unfixable?: Several nations have tried to restore democracy after populist strongmen. It was never the same. (The Washington Post)

The Men Who Want to Push Britain Off a Cliff: Theresa May has a Brexit deal. Now a group of feckless Conservatives wants to torpedo everything. (The New York Times)







Russian interior ministry veteran is named as likely candidate to become Interpol head sparking fears Moscow will use agency to target political foes (The Daily Mail)







A huge question looms over Trump after the CIA concludes the Saudi crown prince ordered Jamal Khashoggi's killing (The Business Insider) Top White House Official Involved in Saudi Sanctions Resigns (The New York Times) The Khashoggi case just won't go away for Trump and his Saudi allies (CNN) Turkey: Khashoggi’s dismembered body possibly carried through Istanbul’s airport: If true, it would show the Saudi operation was far bolder than known to date. (Vox) Trump is defending Mohammed bin Salman’s lies. Congress must insist on the truth. [Editorial] (The Washington Post) Killing Khashoggi: How a Brutal Saudi Hit Job Unfolded (The New York Times)















Stop the Harm: Remove the Tariffs on Canada and Mexico (The US Chamber of Commerce)




More than 14,000 immigrant children are in U.S. custody, an all-time high (The San Francisco Chronicle)

Trump says 'good time' for a government shutdown if no money for border wall (CNN)




Two Years In, Trump Struggles to Master Role of Military Commander (The New York Times)

‘Illegal, Unheard of, Highly Suspicious’: Where Is Matthew Whitaker’s Financial Disclosure Form? (Law and Crime)













Top GOP adviser denounces Georgia’s Brian Kemp: ‘He cheated & undermined democracy every step of the way’ (RawStory)

Despite what Trump says, Finland fires are totally different from California fires (The Los Angeles Times)




     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Friday, November 16, 2018

Friday roundup (11-16-18)

CIA concludes Saudi crown prince ordered Jamal Khashoggi’s assassination (The Washington Post)













Is Mike Pence Loyal? Trump Is Asking, Despite His Recent Endorsement (The New York Times)




George Conway: Republican Party has become a 'personality cult' under Trump (Yahoo!News)

Trump says he’s finished writing answers to questions from special counsel Robert Mueller [but has not turned them in] (The Washington Post)







Matt Whitaker faces new challenge in Supreme Court: Trump has faced a growing backlash over his choice to appoint Whitaker as acting attorney general after forcing Jeff Sessions to resign. (NBCNews) Matthew Whitaker and the Corruption of Justice: The real question isn’t whether the acting attorney general’s appointment is lawful, but whether it is part of a broader attempt to subvert the rule of law. (The New York Times)













Judge hands CNN a victory in its bid to restore Jim Acosta’s White House press pass (The Washington Post) Trump On Acosta: ‘If He Misbehaves, We’ll Throw Him Out’ (TalkingPointsMemo) Five takeaways from Friday’s CNN-White House ruling (The Washington Post)

Trump demands more ‘decorum’ from reporters, threatens to restrict media access: "We always have the option of just leaving." (ThinkProgress) Trump’s New Solution To Unruly Reporters: Tells Staff To ‘Just Leave’ (TalkingPointsMemo)










Georgia governor election: Democrat Stacey Abrams acknowledges defeat (USAToday)




The Midterms Sent an Unmistakable Message to Republicans: So long as the GOP stays loyal to President Trump, its prospects on the electoral map will be sharply restricted. (The Atlantic)

Trump plans to nominate Andrew Wheeler, former coal lobbyist, as EPA chief (The Washington Post)

U.S. Marshals Service spending millions on DeVos security in unusual arrangement: The cost to taxpayers could be as much as $19.8 million through next year, according to figures provided to NBC News. (NBCNews)

More than 1,000 unaccounted for in Northern California wildfires death toll grows to 71: The death toll for two fires burning in California is 74, officials said. (NBCNews)

Dem congressman: Force gun owners to get rid of assault weapons: Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., drops a grenade into the middle of the gun debate. (NBCNews)

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Thursday, November 15, 2018

Thursday roundup (11-14-18)

Trump Gets NATO Backwards: The U.S. defends Europe out of self-interest. (The Atlantic)

Brexit resignations leave E.U. divorce deal — and PM May's future — in doubt: “The very man who was effectively her main negotiator — for him to resign I think is devastating.” (NBCNews) UK prime minister has 'a huge mountain to climb' as Brexit battle lines are drawn over draft deal (CNBC)

Saudi Arabia’s latest account of Khashoggi’s death is shocking in its audacity [Editorial] (The Washington Post) Saudis Shift Account of Khashoggi Killing Again, as 5 Agents Face Death Penalty (The New York Times) Saudi Arabia distances crown prince from killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi (The Washington Post)







Trump administration's reported effort to 'barter' a US resident to convince Turkey to ramp down Khashoggi probe stuns foreign-policy veterans (The Business Insider)










Trump’s Tax Cut Was Supposed to Change Corporate Behavior. Here’s What Happened.: Nearly a year after the tax cut, economic growth has accelerated. Wage growth has not. Companies are buying back stock and business investment is a mixed bag. (The New York Times)




AP source: Whitaker told Graham that Mueller probe to go on (The Associated Press)




In a 'self-defeating and self-incriminating' slipup, Trump just indicated he installed Matthew Whitaker to kill the Russia probe (The Business Insider) Hands off the special counsel, Mr. President [Editorial] (The Washington Post)

Mueller Team Has ‘Gone Absolutely Nuts,’ Trump Says, Resuming Attacks on Russia Inquiry (The New York Times)
















Trump's Attack on Mueller Is About One Thing: Fear: Why would the president risk adding to Mueller’s obstruction inquiry? There are bigger things at stake for him. (Bloomberg) Seems Plausible (TalkingPointsMemo)



















‘Preparing for the worst’: Mueller anxiety pervades Trump world: Half a dozen people in contact with the White House and other Trump officials say a deep anxiety has started to set in. [Senior Republican: "You can see it in Trump’s body language all week long. There’s something troubling him."] (Politico) What Trump’s Latest Outburst About Mueller Could Mean: The president was unusually specific in his attacks against the special counsel. (The Atlantic)







American Democracy Is Still Under Existential Threat (HuffPost)

Acting AG Matt Whitaker worked for a company that hawked “time travel” technology and other insane products (VICE News)







Sen. Graham: Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker says special counsel Robert Mueller is handling the Russia probe correctly (CNBC)




Judge Andrew Napolitano: Will the real attorney general please stand up? (FoxNews)

Trump Is Reshaping The Judiciary. A Breakdown By Race, Gender And Qualification (National Public Radio)

Trump’s Orwellian argument for violating CNN’s First Amendment rights (The Washington Post)

Under Ben Carson, more families live in HUD housing that fails health and safety inspections: While HUD Secretary Ben Carson pledged to fix low-income housing, the number of properties cited for health and safety violations has been on the rise. (NBCNews)

Florida orders first statewide hand recounts ever, as legal fights continue (The Miami Herald)

Wells Fargo Cuts 1,000 Jobs Across the U.S. on Mortgage Woes (Bloomberg)

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Initial jobless claims (Weekly report, 11-15-18)

The purpose of this weekly post is to watch how initial jobless claims in the United States are trending (up or down) and to keep track of whether the numbers are holding below 500,000, which would indicate at least the appearance of a fairly healthy economic situation.

According to the report released today:

"Initial jobless claims, a rough way to measure layoffs, edged up by 2,000 to 216,000 in the seven days ended Nov. 10." (Marketwatch)

SEE LAST WEEK'S POST HERE.

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Wednesday roundup (11-14-18)

Brexit deal: Theresa May gets cabinet approval for her draft agreement (The Washington Post) Britain Is Rushing to Seal a Brexit Deal Few Support: Brexit negotiators have overcome the Irish border impasse, but can their deal pass muster in Parliament? (The Atlantic)

America will need years to clean up the toxins Trump has released (The Washington Post)

“Insanity,” “Furious,” “On His Own”: Trump’s Post-Midterms Blues Are Vexing His Staff and Roiling the White House: He’s lashing out at aides and press and foreign leaders, and threatening to roll West Wing heads—but at least he didn’t get his hair wet at the Belleau Wood memorial. (VanityFair) A frightful portrait of a president out of control (The Washington Post)







Trump’s lackadaisical post-election schedule, charted (The Washington Post)

A Week After the Midterms, Trump Seems to Forget the Caravan (The New York Times)

Trump Is Mulling A Wide-Ranging Shakeup, Sources Say: Trump is looking to prepare his White House for divided government, but it is unclear who is going and who is staying. (The Associated Press) Staff anger spills over at White House: A drumbeat of exits is mixing with Trump’s anger after the midterms and a much-criticized trip to Europe. (Politico)

Deputy national security adviser Mira Ricardel forced out of White House (CNN)




Bill to protect Mueller blocked in Senate (The Hill)







Poll: Democrats divided over whether Pelosi should be Speaker (The Hill)

The Senate shouldn't be sleeping on Whitaker's unconstitutional appointment (The Washington Examiner)  How Trump’s move to put a loyalist over Mueller is already backfiring: Bipartisan criticism and legal maneuvering may limit Matthew Whitaker’s options as acting attorney general. (Politico)

Whitaker’s unusual path to Justice Department included owning day-care center, trailer maker and concrete supplier (The Washington Post) An Exhaustive Timeline of Our New Acting Attorney General's Astoundingly Crooked Career: Year by year, the onetime Iowa tight end descended into grifting and scamming. He's a perfect match for his new boss. (Esquire)










Conservative Lawyers Say Trump Has Undermined the Rule of Law (The New York Times)







Trump to focus counter-extremism program solely on Islam - sources (Reuters)




Fox News stands with CNN: ‘Passes for working White House journalists should never be weaponized’ (FoxNews)







U.S. military edge has eroded to ‘a dangerous degree,’ study for Congress finds (The Washington Post)

Surgeons — many of them gun owners — recommend new gun-safety approaches (The Washington Post)

'It's going to get worse': Officials fear many more deaths from California wildfires that have already claimed 59 lives (ABCNews)

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.