Thursday, May 23, 2019

Thursday roundup (05-23-19)

Trump Officials Prepare to Bypass Congress to Sell Weapons to Gulf Nations (The New York Times)

Trump Gives Farmers $16 Billion in Aid Amid Prolonged China Trade War (The New York Times)

Congress is winning the legal battle against the White House: If the president defies a court order, it’s game on (The Economist)

Trump+Taxes+Deutsche Bank+Mnuchin+Barr = Cover-Up: For a White House that’s as dedicated to “transparency” as this one, there sure are a lot of things being kept under wraps. (Bloomberg)
















Why Did Deutsche Bank Keep Lending to Donald Trump? — “Trump, Inc.” Podcast: The bank kept writing checks even after Trump defaulted on loans worth hundreds of millions and sued it. Now Congressional investigators are going to court to uncover the financial records behind their relationship. (ProPublica) Deutsche Bank Is The 'Rosetta Stone' To Unlock Trump Finances, Journalist Says [May 9] (National Public Radio)










‘Never A Big Fan!’: A Bewildering List Of Hires Trump Praised, Then Attacked (TalkingPointsMemo)

Previously unreported sixth migrant child died in U.S. custody last year: The 10-year-old El Salvadoran girl, who entered U.S. care in March 2018, died in September of fever and respiratory distress. (NBCNews)




Reagan Slams Border Fence, Bush Defends Undocumented ‘Good People’ In 1980 Debate: Old footage of the two future presidents offers a stark contrast to the GOP of today. (HuffPost)




WikiLeaks founder indicted on Espionage Act charges, raising issue of press freedoms (CNN) What does Julian Assange's new indictment mean for journalists? (CNNBusiness)

Trump orders intelligence community to cooperate with review on Russia probe origins (Reuters)




     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Initial jobless claims (Weekly report, 05-23-19)

The purpose of this weekly post is to watch how initial jobless claims in the United States are trending (up or down) and to keep track of whether the numbers are holding below 500,000, which would indicate at least the appearance of a fairly healthy economic situation.

According to the report released today:

"Initial jobless claims, a rough way to measure layoffs, dipped by 1,000 to 211,000 in the seven days ended May 18, the government said Thursday." (Marketwatch)

SEE LAST WEEK'S POST HERE.

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Wednesday roundup (05-22-19)

The future of Italy's coalition government remains uncertain despite reassurances from Salvini (CNBC) Italy's Matteo Salvini Hopes To Lead Nationalist Wave In Upcoming European Elections (National Public Radio)

Dead in the water? May's last-ditch effort to save her Brexit deal looks doomed to fail (CNBC)

[Meanwhile,] U.K. Austerity Has Inflicted ‘Great Misery,’ U.N. Official Says (The New York Times)

Prepare for difficult times, China's Xi urges as trade war simmers (Reuters)

[In the United States,] Trump, Angered by ‘Phony’ Inquiries, Blows Up Meeting With Pelosi and Schumer (The New York Times) Pelosi goads Trump into another temper tantrum (The Washington Post)

'I don't do cover-ups': Trump lashes out at Democrats after canceling White House infrastructure sit-down (CNBC) President Trump says he doesn’t ‘do cover-ups.’ Well, glad that’s settled (The Los Angeles Times) The various coverups of Donald ‘I don’t do coverups’ Trump (The Washington Post)













Trump’s Financial Secrets Move Closer to Disclosure (The New York Times)

Judge rejects Trump’s request to halt congressional subpoenas for his banking records (The Washington Post)










Wells Fargo, TD Bank have already given Trump-related financial documents to Congress: The disclosures come as a federal judge ruled Wednesday that two other banks — Deutsche Bank and Capital One — can give financial documents to Congress. (NBCNews)

A conservative activist’s behind-the-scenes campaign to remake the nation’s courts (The Washington Post)




Michael Avenatti charged with stealing $300,000 from former client Stormy Daniels (CNN) [The indictment] (DocumentCloud)

Blaming Brexit, British Steel collapses putting about 25,000 jobs at risk (CNNBusiness)

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Tuesday roundup (05-21-19)

British Steel Hangs in Balance as Government Bailout Sought (Bloomberg)

[In the United States,] GOP Senator Says Trump's Trade War Has Farmers On 'Verge Of Financial Collapse': Jerry Moran of Kansas urged Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue to find a better response than unreliable government aid. (HuffPost)

[In a sign of "fissures in the executive branch,"] Confidential draft IRS memo says tax returns must be given to Congress unless president invokes executive privilege (The Washington Post)

Trump's Constitutional Conflicts Are Exposed: The president loves the Constitution when it helps stop his advisers from testifying, less so when it’s used to demand the disclosure of his finances. (Bloomberg)

Is Nancy Pelosi’s dam on impeachment starting to break? (The Washington Post) Some in Pelosi’s leadership team rebel on impeachment, press her to begin an inquiry (The Washington Post)




[Versus] Pelosi’s Strategy Is Working, and Trump Is One Step Closer to Being F*cked: Democrats who want impeachment yesterday aren’t paying attention. Between McGahn, the ruling on taxes, and Cohen, the Resistance has had a banner week. (The Daily Beast)

Trump Suggested His Pet Attorney General May Prosecute His Enemies for 'Treason': The American constitutional republic is crumbling. (Esquire)
















Cuccinelli, a righteous, faith-driven warrior who delights in provocation, will join Trump administration (The Washington Post) Trump Expected to Pick Ken Cuccinelli for Immigration Policy Role (The New York Times)

NY Moves to Ensure Trump Pardons Can't Nix State Charges: New York lawmakers have voted to tweak the state's double jeopardy law to ensure that a presidential pardon for federal crimes won't apply to similar state charges. [The Associated Press and Wire Service Content via] (US News and World Report)

Former Marine Commandant tells Trump that pardoning troops accused of war crimes 'relinquishes the moral high ground' (Task and Purpose)

[Meanwhile:]



Justin Amash Could Keep Trump From Getting Re-Elected: Here’s how. (TheBulwark)




Bigger cuts expected: 23,000 more Ford layoffs needed [over and above the 7,000 just announced], analysts say (The Detroit Free Press)

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Monday, May 20, 2019

Monday roundup (05-20-19)

Italy's government seems to be at breaking point — here are 5 reasons why it's going wrong (CNBC)

[In the United States,] Judge rules against Trump in fight over president’s financial records (The Washington Post) Judge orders Trump accounting firm to hand over records to Congress (CNN) Trump’s Secrecy Fight Escalates as Judge Rules for Congress in Early Test (The New York Times)










NYT Deutsche Bank money-laundering bombshell will make ‘serious problems’ for president: Trump biographer (RawStory)

White House directs former counsel Don McGahn not to testify before House panel (CNN) Some Republicans unsettled by Trump’s sweeping claims of immunity: Veteran lawmakers are increasingly alarmed over the president's claim that Congress can't police him. (Politico) Republicans who don’t protect Trump’s corruption will pay a very steep price (The Washington Post)













Trump’s Demands for Investigations of Opponents Draw Intensifying Criticism (The New York Times)




Cohen told lawmakers Trump attorney Jay Sekulow encouraged him to falsely claim Moscow project ended in January 2016 (The Washington Post) Cohen: Trump’s attorney urged false testimony: President Donald Trump’s former fixer also said Jay Sekulow dangled a pardon to 'shut down' the Russia probe. (Politico)

Trump’s Position on the Mueller Report is Legally Ridiculous — and Dangerous: Congress needs the full report to do its job. (The New York Times)

Amash doubles down on Trump and impeachment (The Hill) Impeachment Appeal Pushes Justin Amash From G.O.P. Gadfly to Insurgent [see last paragraph] (The New York Times) Trump transition team member heaps praise on Justin Amash — and calls him more of a Republican than the president (RawStory) Why Trump should be worried about Justin Amash [= could he become a Libertarian candidate for President?] (The Washington Post)







The Profanity President: Trump’s Four-Letter Vocabulary (The New York Times)

Pardoning soldiers accused of war crimes would be immoral (CNN) Pardoning War Criminals Isn’t Just Wrong. It Hurts the Military and American Interests. (TheBulwark)

Republicans are now tied up in knots on antiabortion rhetoric (The Washington Post)

Ford to cut 7,000 jobs [worldwide] by August, including 900 this week (CNBC)

Dressbarn is going out of business, plans to shut all 650 stores (CNBC)

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Sunday, May 19, 2019

Sunday roundup (05-19-19)

Now Ocean Plastics Could Be Killing Oxygen-Making Bacteria (Wired)

Deutsche Bank Staff Saw Suspicious Activity in Trump and Kushner Accounts (The New York Times)




Trump dishonors the military he claims to love (The Washington Post)
















     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

Saturday, May 18, 2019

Saturday roundup (05-18-19)

GOP lawmaker says Trump’s conduct meets ‘threshold for impeachment’ (The Washington Post)



















AG Barr's FBI investigation, President Trump and the threat from within: By perpetuating Trump's falsehoods about the FBI and Mueller's report, Barr has become the kind of threat capable of doing severe harm. (NBCNews)







Trump Shows Signs He Will Pardon Servicemen Accused or Convicted of War Crimes (The New York Times)










President Trump’s Air Force One video trashing Mayor Bill de Blasio may have violated law (The New York Daily News) ‘It’s entirely inappropriate’: Trump shot a political video on Air Force One (The Washington Post)

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.