Monday, June 27, 2016

Monday roundup (06-27-2016)

After Brexit, French right-wingers have their own E.U. exit hopes (The Washington Post) Is Brexit The First Of Many Dominoes? A Few Charts (ZeroHedge blog)

Italy prepares to shield its banks from Brexit fallout (Reuters) Italy eyes €40bn bank rescue as first Brexit domino falls by Ambrose Evans-Pritchard (The Telegraph)

Brexit May Well Never Happen: The victors are already looking sheepish about leaving the EU. Maybe they won’t! (Slate)

OPEC’s Pain Is Only Getting Worse As Revenues Continue To Fall (OilPrice)

Here’s what [United States Presidential Candidate] Bernie Sanders has won in the Democratic platform (so far) (The Washington Post)

Rickards & Ritholtz Debate Gold [Bloomberg via] (The Big Picture blog) Gold's Role in the Financial System: James Rickards, editor at Strategic Intelligence, and Barry Ritholtz, founder and chief investment officer at Ritholtz Wealth Management, discuss investing in gold and its role in the financial system. They speak to Bloomberg's Joe Weisenthal on "What'd You Miss?" [June 23] (Bloomberg)



Tech distributor [Ingram Micro] cutting 937 Fort Worth jobs amid Chinese buyout (The Fort Worth Star-Telegram)

Metro General Manager Paul J. Wiedefeld to eliminate 500 jobs [at District of Columbia transit agency] (The Washington Post)

     The aim of this blog is to show (mostly from reports in mainstream respected news sources) that there is reason to believe that both the United States and the global economies remain fragile in the wake of the financial crisis of 2008 and that a number of threats exist today that could, if they worsened, bring about economic depression -- not just a minor depression, but a depression worse than the Great Depression. Key threats include excessive risk-taking by financial firms, unchecked by effective regulation; the continued existence of "too big to fail" institutions; and most especially, the amassing of levels of public and private debt which could become unsustainable.

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